Museum Interactives has an expertise in developing exhibits- both display based and hands-on interactives. Few of our products can be found in this section.

The Light and Sound Show of the Solar System

The Vikram Sarabhai Space Exhibition, Ahmedabad, India
It consists of a ceiling mounted model of the Solar system with the Moon and all the planets depicted on a space frame that spins very slowly. The planets, their physical features, orbits and spin axes are highlighted at the appropriate time, synchronizing with the audio commentary, using a programmed switching logic integrated with a touch screen monitor. The monitor also displays the graphic contents as the show unravels. The exhibit has an optional independent control, in case the visitor desires to go solo. The exhibit which is 3.5m in diameter, hangs from the ceiling at a height of about 3m from the ground. The audio narration and the contents are also available in three languages.


The Light Show of the GSLV Mk III

The Vikram Sarabhai Space Exhibition, Ahmedabad, India
The GSLV Mk III Exhibit is standing 3.5 meters tall, and is an exact replica of the GSLV Mk III developed by ISRO. On first looks, one can get a feel of the complete launch vehicle with its beautiful exterior surface in place. The exhibit's design exposes the interior parts of the rocket without spoiling the exterior beauty. This has been achieved by selecting the right combination of special materials and lights and integrating them with a brilliant software. The user interface of the software is displayed on a touch panel in front of the model, which allows the user to explore the launch vehicle inside out.


Walk the Function

Mathematics of Planet Earth, 2013, Bengaluru
We use mathematical functions all the time. The "Walk The Function" exhibit, the idea of which was inspired from the Mathematikum in Giessen, Germany, is a way to make this idea of a "graph" perceptible. In mathematical terms, the graph of the position versus time would trace a predefined curve. Several types of functions - sine, triangular, rectangular, saw tooth etc, can be generated by plotting the user's position against time. 'Walk the Function' is an experiential exhibit wherein the visitor becomes part of a live mathematical function. He / she has to walk on a straight path in such a way that his/her position on the screen follows a predefined graph.


Chladni's Plate

Mathematics of Planet Earth, 2013, Bengaluru
This exhibit showcases how different structures resonate at different frequencies upon application of force. Resonance can lead to large oscillations, in turn resulting in specific vibration patterns. Knowledge of these vibrations, which can be calculated using mathematical equations describing them, helps engineers build structures which can withstand earthquakes, or strong winds and waves. This exhibit shows the vibrating patterns of a square aluminum plate. Sprinkle a little sand on the plate and adjust the frequency to see how different patterns are formed.


Tipping point of climate change

Mathematics of Planet Earth, 2013, Bengaluru
This exhibit explains how ecosystem reacts to external factors such as human interactions, which leads to "tipping points". This explains how external factors such as construction of a dam or a factory, or deforestation of an area can cause irreversible changes in the ecosystem, which can be sometimes catastrophic as well. The physical exhibit on ecosystems and tipping points provides an illuminating example of such a phenomenon.


Rotating Table

Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum, Bengaluru
This is an open ended interactive exhibit. Place disks and other objects on the rotating table and see how centrifugal and centripetal forces act on them. One can observe, hypothesize, test and discover various behaviors of objects in a rotating frame of reference! This is a very captivating experimental platform.


Wave Model

Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum, Bengaluru
A perfect exhibit for understanding the concepts of standing and moving transverse waves as well as moving sound waves. A two metre long spring can be oscillated sidewise to create a standing transverse wave. By slowly varying the number of oscillations in a given time, the relationship between wave length and frequency can be experienced. Similarly by gently tapping on the spring when stationary, one can observe the longitudinal transmission of the disturbance like in sound waves.


Waves in Liquid

Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum, Bengaluru
The waves formed in the interface of the two immiscible liquids demonstrate the characteristics of both the transverse and the longitudinal waves at the same time. One can also demonstrate how two liquids of varying densities makes on float over the other!


Hands on Electric Motor

Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum, Bengaluru
You can actually create a rotating magnetic field by switching the electrical polarity of the armature. Now by aligning the magnetic field in the right sequence with the field magnets, you can drive the motor and experience how a rotating magnetic field drives an electric motor.